We Manufacture Disaster

Economics and health are connected in many ways. John Mauldin in his May 16, 2015 letter paraphrases economist Bill White:

Central bank models, he told us, are artificial machines. His best quote was, “The basic problem with central banks: they think they know how the economy works.” Their models are built to be gamed and always assume a return to equilibrium. But there is no equilibrium – you are where you are. The problem with equilibrium models is that they don’t reflect reality.

An economy is like a forest ecosystem, not a machine. We are on a very bad path – debt is unsustainable. Notice the environment since the 2008 crisis: the Eurozone crisis is a limited variant on a global crisis; fiscal and regulatory restraint is not helpful; and monetary policy is the only game in town and is not effective.

That our world leaders in finance may count on a magical “return to equilibrium” has playful charm, suggesting our cognitive elite know we are so much sand being washed around by the sea. Chaos, however, arises from the elite’s artificial gaming. Generally, we’d be safe with natural regression patterns, but we manufacture disaster.

Bill White’s thinking is so long it goes past economics. If he weren’t an economist, he might see that central banks themselves are pawns of a larger natural force, playing out an adjustment to humanity. Lavish gaming flows forth from Wall Street, making for anti-elite anger, but on the backside, the gaming is the hand of the universe.

Look how interchangeable and universal Mr. White’s thinking is by swapping a few words (my creation):

Pharmaceutical models, he told us, are artificial machines. His best quote was, “The basic problem with pharma companies: they think they know how benelles—good cells—work.” Their models are built to be gamed and always assume a return to equilibrium. But there is no equilibrium – you are where you are. The problem with equilibrium models is that they don’t reflect reality.

Your benelles are like a forest ecosystem, not a machine. We are on a very bad path – health is unsustainable. Notice the environment since the 2008 crisis: ever-greater reliance on toxic chemicals for health is a limited variant on a global crisis; drug recalls have not been helpful; and healthcare policy is the only game in town and is not effective.

White’s thinking applies to human endeavor. The chaos of our short-term, gaming nature is accelerated by our cognitive elite, who cash out better than everyone else. That they provide acceleration is why they are selected for. White collar crimes characterize today’s financial repression by central banks, as well as health repression by central governments.

As central banks are pawns of a larger natural force, the question becomes, what larger force is behind healthcare? Currently, this larger force has the power to make us believe that preventing honeybee extinction from ultra-pesticides is not healthcare, but x-raying your teeth every six months is. This is the reverse of truth, but it’s the only game in town.

The shadow force behind healthcare is priming our descendants to co-exist with high levels of carbon dioxide, plastic, metal, radiation, no honeybees, etc. For instance, we are all currently BPA poisoned but some of us handle it. Moreover, there are high levels of heavy metal pollution in staples like rice. And x-rays and cell phones are silently selecting reproductive cells with high natural resistance to radiation.

Healthcare is not acting to provide health to humans as we know them today. Rather, the healthcare system is serving nature’s purpose of selecting tomorrow’s humans, which will be subservient to, and likely fused with, computers. Indeed, healthcare already treats our benelles as little units to be programmed. To achieve success in the coming robotic world, benelles will have to do well with less oxygen, more plastic and metal, little fresh food, and lots of EMF and radiation. Imagine, our current form in space is…death.

In other words, we are going to have to evolve. Central banks and Wall Street are playing the role of reducing population, and healthcare is playing the role of selecting computer-compatible genes. Honestly, these are both critical roles for our species’ survival, but it will be better if we—even the cognitive elite in their zenith—cannot perceive the natural forces. In the system, our place is to focus on sex and consumption, and quibbles over whether girls can marry girls; all this preserves public calm via an illusion someone is in control, and a few votes away from making some legislation to give us a great life.

We are not in control and robots won’t need honeybees. The future will be a strange world, but our human journey always has been strange for those yet to go, or left behind. Even those who make this next leap into the world of artificial intelligence and space will be surpassed by future models too difficult to glimpse. This path is sacred, with benelles as the foundation, as the universe repeats and repeats.